Service Tree

The Service Tree lists all services in "branched" groups, starting with the very general and moving to the very specific. Click on the name of any group name to see the sub-groups available within it. Click on a service code to see its details and the providers who offer that service.

Central Intake/Assessment for Mental Health Services

Programs that coordinate access to outpatient mental health services and/or psychiatric hospitalization and residential treatment facilities in a community by evaluating the nature and severity of an individual's mental health problem, determining which service response would best meet the needs of the patient, doing an eligibility assessment, and providing a referral to (or facilitating placement in) an appropriate program or facility. Mental health triage services may be located in an emergency department, community mental health service, call center or co-located with other specialized mental health services.

Clinical Psychiatric Evaluation

Programs that utilize a variety of means to evaluate the mental or emotional status or functioning of people who may be experiencing acute or chronic disturbances. Diagnostic techniques may include observation of the person's behavior, interviews with the individual and significant others, psychological testing as indicated, medical examination, assessment for psychotropic or other medication, and the formulation of an appropriate, ongoing treatment plan which may include voluntary or involuntary hospitalization.

Forensic Mental Health Evaluation

Programs that provide an assessment of the mental health status of individuals who are involved in criminal or civil law cases at the request of the court or an attorney who is attempting to evaluate the situation. Forensic evaluations are completed by mental health personnel (generally psychiatrists or psychologists) who have additional training in the law; and may address any of a wide range of issues such as an individual's fitness to stand trial (i.e., their ability to assist in their own defense), the competency of the accused at the time of a crime, waiver of Miranda rights, the validity of an insanity plea, the legitimacy of a stress-related illness claim arising from an individual's employment, the extent of brain damage that may have occurred in a head injury case, a child's ability to testify or a person's competency to manage his or her own affairs. Forensic evaluations may also be done in situations involving juvenile justice issues, child abuse, child custody disputes, termination of parental rights and other cases that are being heard in juvenile court or family law court.

Mental Health Screening

Programs that offer simple tests that people who are concerned about their emotional health can take to learn more about their symptoms and ways of coping with them. Individuals generally have an opportunity to see a film and/or hear a talk about the causes, symptoms and treatment of specific mental health problems; complete a screening questionnaire; and talk about the results with a mental health professional. People who test positively are encouraged to seek further evaluation and, potentially, treatment. Most mental health screenings are confidential and available at no cost. Mental health screenings may also be available by telephone or online.

Psychological Assessment

Programs that utilize a variety of means to evaluate and identify the best mode of treatment for individuals who have developmental deficits, learning disabilities, neurological impairments, loss of memory, behavioral problems, personality disorders or adjustment problems. Diagnostic techniques may include observation of the person's behavior, interviews with the individual and significant others, psychological testing as indicated, and neuropsychological assessment in situations where organic involvement such as brain injury is suspected. Ongoing assessment may be provided as a means of evaluating the effectiveness of treatment.

Psychological Testing

Programs that provide a variety of standardized tests including personality inventories, aptitude tests, intelligence tests, attitude tests, projective measures and affective tests to evaluate the psychosocial functioning of people who may be experiencing mental, emotional or social difficulties. Psychological testing is often a part of a broader psychological assessment, and may be used in differential diagnosis to substantiate that a particular diagnosis is correct.

Psychosocial Evaluation

Programs that assess the emotional and social functioning of an individual or group including a family in the context of all of the factors that combine to affect that functioning and lend meaning to its interpretation, for the purpose of identifying problem areas and developing a plan that will support identified strengths and resolve or minimize identified difficulties. The process may include an evaluation of communication and coping skills on a personal and interpersonal basis; the impact of the environment on functioning; and the deficits in knowledge, support, skills and ability which must be considered to understand current functioning and to develop a treatment program that addresses the person or group in context. This process may be utilized with people who are experiencing minor or time-limited situational problems and as a component of a comprehensive evaluation of someone whose difficulties are severe and/or chronic.

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